Caledoniyya

A Historical Take on Honor Killings

Courtesy of the noted Egyptian historian, ‘Abd al-Rahman Al-Jabarti, whose account of the French expedition to Europe (1798-1801) yields the following nugget on honor killings in fin-de-siecle Cairo:
Al-Bakri’s daughter, Zeinab, was rumored to have been a mistress to Napoleon, although evidence indicates that her only crime was dressing like a French woman and appearing unveiled in public. Her father, al-Jabarti reported, disowned her before the Ottoman governor and did not intervene when the authorities disposed of her by “breaking of the neck.” Hawa, on the other hand, had abandoned her husband, Isma’il Kashif al-Shami, and married someone named Nicola, a captain of ships. When Ottoman rule returned, her Egyptian husband brought her back to live with him and then sought official permission to kill her. He later strangled her, along with her white female slave.
Taken from The Mobilization of Muslim Women in Egypt, by Ghada Hashem Talhami. University Press of Florida, 1996. p. 3. ISBN: 0-81301429-8.

Courtesy of the noted Egyptian historian, ‘Abd al-Rahman Al-Jabarti, whose account of the French expedition to Europe (1798-1801) yields the following nugget on honor killings in fin-de-siรจcleย Cairo:

Al-Bakri’s daughter, Zeinab, was rumored to have been a mistress to Napoleon, although evidence indicates that her only crime was dressing like a French woman and appearing unveiled in public. Her father, al-Jabarti reported, disowned her before the Ottoman governor and did not intervene when the authorities disposed of her by “breaking of the neck.” Hawa, on the other hand, had abandoned her husband, Isma’il Kashif al-Shami, and married someone named Nicola, a captain of ships. When Ottoman rule returned, her Egyptian husband brought her back to live with him and then sought official permission to kill her. He later strangled her, along with her white female slave.

Taken from The Mobilization of Muslim Women in Egypt, by Ghada Hashem Talhami. University Press of Florida, 1996. p. 3. ISBN: 0-81301429-8.

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This entry was posted on July 25, 2009 by in Egypt, Middle East and tagged , , , .
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